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Multimodal control of stpper motro using TIC controller

Hi
I have a question about TIC stepper motor controller (for example TIC T249) . It is crucial for me to control the stepper motor using two manually switchable modes. One precise mode (encoder position control mode) and one roughly mode (using analog speed control mode or encoder speed control mode).
Is there any possibility to configure the TIC controller in such a way to change control mode (from encoder position control to encoder speed control or analog position control or analog speed control) using some manual switch (connected to the TIC controller) without using additional device like Arduino or PC computer? Good option for me (respect to previously described) is also some manual switch (connected to the TIC controller) which allows me to change the encoder scaling from example 0.01mm/encoder step to 0,1/encoder step when the TIC work in step position mode.
Regards
Maciej
Regards

Hello.

The Tic does not support changing modes or configuration settings from a button or switch like you described.

To change configuration settings like the control mode or encoder prescaler and postscaler values, you would need to use the “Set setting” command via USB (which is what the Tic Control Center uses when you press Apply settings). As noted in the “Command reference” section of the Tic user’s guide, these settings are stored in the Tic’s EEPROM, which is rated for only 100,000 write cycles, so you should be aware of that limitation and be careful not to call the command in a fast loop.

Brandon

Hi Brandon
Thanks for respond. Is that men that I can change the setting using via USB and Tic Control Center only 100 000 in all life time of TIC controller ? Can You tell me what will be happened if I exceed 100 000 write cycles?
Regrads
Maciej

Is there any possibility to change controle mode or encoder prescaler using additional device for example Arduino leonardo (some device which can emulate the mouse and keybord)?
Regards

Is TIC T249 will be work with MPG encoder as a controller (for example http://www.rotaryencoder-yumo.com/products/ism6045-series-mpg-handwheelencoder-ID103.html)
Regards

What size of radiator can be insert in TIC T249? 7,4x7,4 mm?
Regards

After too many erase/write cycles, EEPROM eventually deteriorates and becomes unreliable. For the Tic, the EEPROM is rated for 100,000 cycles.

As I mentioned in my previous post, those are configuration settings that can only be changed via USB; you would need to use a device that can act as a USB host and send native USB commands. Note that the Arduino Leonardo can act as a USB slave device, and not a host.

It looks like the hand wheel encoder you linked to should work with the Tic. Note that the Tic expects that transitions on its encoder inputs will be at least 100 µs apart. If you turn the encoder signal is faster than this, the Tic might miss some encoder counts or could even measure counts in the wrong direction. You can find more information about this in the “Setting up Encoder position control” and “Setting up encoder speed control” sections of the Tic user’s guide.

We do not have any specific recommendations for adding a heat sink or fan, but we generally expect forced air flow to be the most effective method of cooling. You should generally not need to use heat sinks if you are using the Tic T249 within the specifications we list on its product page.

Brandon

Brandon
But if I conect Arduino to TIC using SET DIR pins I will be able to control stepper motor using Arduino (Arduino Uno for example). Is that correct?
I want to conect the TIC T249 with stepper motor that needs max 2,8 Amper. In TIC T249 description available on your site there is a note that T249 can handle 1.8A per phase without heat sink


Can I use TIC T249 without additional cooling for my motor?

You can control the Tic through the STEP and DIR inputs from an Arduino Uno if the Tic’s control mode is set to “STEP/DIR”. When the Tic’s control mode is set to anything other than “STEP/DIR”, the STEP and DIR pins are driven by the Tic itself, and they can also be used as outputs to control an external stepper motor driver.

Since the Tic T249 can only handle 1.8A per phase without additional cooling and your motor can draw up to 2.8A per phase, you would need to limit the current limit the lower of the two (1.8A), which would limit the capabilities of your motor and might cause it to not run properly depending on your setup. We have not done any thorough cooling tests to determine what kind of cooling it would take to get 2.8A per phase continuously (or if it is practically achievable), so you would likely need to do your own tests to determine that. You might consider the Tic 36v4 instead, which can handle 4A per phase continuously without additional cooling.

Brandon

Brandon.
I hoope I have the last questions for you :slight_smile: Can I use 2.4V, 2.5A stepper motor with TIC 36v4 or TIC T249 with limted current to 1,8A? Can I limit the current using TIC control Center?
Can I tell me what TIC will be the best for stepper motor 3,25V / 2,5A / 1,1Nm and for 5V/1,7A/0,66Nm?
Regards
Maciej

If you use a 2.4V, 2.5A stepper motor with the Tic 36v4, you can set the current limit to the full 2.5A per phase rating of the stepper motor without additional cooling. If you use the Tic T249 without additional cooling, you would need to set the current limit to 1.8A per phase; doing this would limit the stepper motor’s capabilities (e.g. reduced torque), so I cannot say whether or not it would work for your system.

Yes, you can set the current limit in the “Input and motor settings” tab of the Tic Control Center.

For a 3.25V, 2.5A per phase stepper motor, the Tic 36v4 is probably the best match since it is the only one we carry that can handle that kind of current without additional cooling. Along with the Tic 36v4, the Tic T249 would also work for a 5V 1.7A per phase motor. Note that there are some differences other than the maximum continuous current per phase. For example, the Tic 36v4 supports higher micro-stepping modes, while the Tic T249 has automatic gain control. You can read about these features on their respective product pages.

Brandon

Brandon. What about TIC T825. Is this controller will work with 5V 1,7A stepper motor (after limit the current to 1,5A)?

As I described before, if your controller is limiting the current to a lower value than the stepper motor is rated for, it will limit the stepper motor’s capabilities (such as torque output). I cannot say whether or not that particular combination would work in your setup, but the Tic T825 would be able to drive that motor with a reduced current limit.

Brandon

Brandon
But what about voltage? TIC T825 and TIC T249 support 8, 5 and 10V respectively. Is this controller will be able to work with my 5V, 1,7A stepper motor?
Regards

The stepper motor’s rated voltage is just the voltage at which each coil draws the rated current. Since all of the Tic controllers support current limiting, you will be within spec for your motor when the current limit is configured appropriately. Using a higher voltage can actually have some benefits such as higher achievable step rates; you can find more information about this under the “FAQs” tab of any of the Tic product pages.

Brandon

Thanks Brandon. Now I got clarity. All the best.
Regrads
Maciej

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